Tag Archives: forklift

CASS: Equipment Training for Students

At Hugg & Hall, we pride ourselves on not only our high levels of customer service through our parts, rental, and service departments, but also through our training programs. We care about the future of the skilled trade workforce, which is why we offer equipment training and certifications for students who are at least 18 years old. 

High School Students Learn Skilled Trades

“CASS”, a.k.a the Career Academy of Siloam Springs strives to encourage students to become skilled workers before graduating High School. Students in this program are able to complete hands on learning and instructional courses taught by professionals in the business during their High School years. Thanks to the opportunities CASS offers, these students will be able to succeed at having a career in a local manufacturing plant, such as Simmons Foods, or Tyson, immediately after graduation.

CASS works with local companies to provide various kinds of equipment training for their students. Opportunities for students in this program have included courses in welding, HVAC, electrical, and even trucking! Because many students graduate and go on to study at universities, skilled workers and laborers are in short supply. The CASS program encourages change and produce groups of young skilled workers who are excited to learn a skilled trade! 

To learn more about the CASS program, visit their Facebook page, here

Hugg &Hall Hosts CASS for Student Lift Training

The Siloam Springs CASS program has trusted Hugg & Hall to provide equipment training for their students for the last 4 years. Hugg & Hall has also provided student training for programs in Berryville as well as Clarksville for the last several years. At the end of April, ten students attended courses at our Springdale, AR location to be trained on safe forklift and aerial lift operations. Warehouse and manufacturing operations covet these skills from potential workers.

Students attended an in depth instructional course in our training room each morning with professional trainer and certified operator, Bob Hendricks. After their classroom instruction, the students stepped outside to receive hands on forklift operations training and aerial lift training. Thanks to our training department, these students have officially completed and passed the courses. Because of the high standard of quality assurance Hugg & Hall has, the students are able to state to companies that they can safely and certifiably operate these pieces of machinery.

“I love teaching young students! They come into class ready to learn as a blank slate. Sometimes when you teach those who have been in the business for a long time, getting them to unlearn bad habits can be difficult. Students who come into our training sessions are eager to learn and learn the right way.” – Bob Hendricks, trainer

 

Training with Hugg & Hall:

Hugg & Hall provides safety training for all of our equipment in order to keep you and your company OSHA compliant. Our Training Department commits themselves to exceeding OSHA’s stringent requirements; featuring experienced and highly trained instructors. Training is offered on warehouse, yard, and rough terrain forklifts, as well as aerial work platforms, Bobcat Equipment, and pedestrian training.

To learn more and book your next forklift operations training session, check out the Operator Training section of our website:

Equipment Safety Training Certifications – Hugg & Hall Equipment Co. (hugghall.com)

Average Lifespan of a Forklift

Forklifts, and any heavy equipment for that matter, are a pricey investment. We want to get the most for our money, and want machinery that will last for years to come. So, what is the average lifespan of a forklift?

How Old is My Forklift?

A forklift’s lifespan is measured by hours of use, not years. The industry measures forklift lifespans in hours because every business utilizes their machines at different rates.

For example- if you are wanting to purchase a used forklift from, say a Hugg & Hall salesmen, which would you rather purchase:

A 1-year-old forklift from a prominent local warehouse company that ran its forklift 8 hours per day, seven days per week. (Approximately 2,912 hours total) OR

A forklift from a family owned business that utilized their forklift 12 hours per month for five years. (720 hours total)

This is why we look at machinery in terms of hours instead of actual physical age. The stress on a forklift’s lift mass and the process of constantly lifting and lowering equipment is what causes most machines to break down over time, not so much any parts wearing from age.

How Long Should I Expect My Forklift to Last?

The average lifespan of a forklift is 10,000 hours. This may vary depending on the manufacturer, brands like Doosan and Toyota typically have longer lifespans of 15,000-20,000 hours. When your forklift starts sounding like the junkyard will be its new home soon, a refurb program may save the day! Your forklift will receive a through inspection based on its history and needs. To utilize Hugg & Hall’s refurb program, contact your local PSSR!

The Pressure to Perform

The Pressure to Perform

 

Tire pressure is the manufacturers recommended inflation rate, variant on load, speed, and other components. Proper measures of tire pressure are read during cold inflation before the machine is operated. Checking the psi of each tire should be an essential part of any pre-use inspection.

Both under and over inflation of your machines tires will result in unnecessary wear, potentially leading to loss of control or accidents. Do not be fooled though, tire inspections should not just be done visually, tires can lose up to half of their pressure before appearing to be flat. This lack of proper inflation puts the tires at risk of tread loss and loss of structural integrity.

Lack of pressure will also cause bending when the tires move. This allows for build-up of internal heat, increasing resistance requiring the machine more fuel or more frequent stops to charge. The depletion of air may seem impossible in your machine’s new tires, but it is important to note that even properly maintained tires naturally leak pressure over time, up to 10% of the recommended weight.

Under Inflation

A machine with low tire pressure is at a reduced level of stability even in the most perfect operating conditions. Additionally, it is more complicated to make quick maneuvers when pressures are low. Even though 5 psi below the manufacturer’s guide can seem insignificant, it is important to acknowledge that in some machines that can be 20% of the tire’s recommended pressure.

Over Inflation

Having increased tire pressure leads to stiff, rough riding tires. The additional pressure allows for the machine to have less contact with the work surface below, which reduces stability. Over inflation can also lead to tires being easily damaged when contacting hazards that were not immediately noticed. Although it may be tempting to overinflate tires for heightened cornering response, it is important to keep machine operators safe with pressures kept at the recommended psi.

Performing with Confidence

Once you have determined the appropriate tire pressure recommended by the equipment manufacturer, you should add a pressure check to your pre-use inspection. This inspection should be done on all equipment, whether rented, leased, or owned. Recommendations may include several different pressures dependent on load, it is important to take the days tasks into account when determining the appropriate psi.

In several new machines tire pressure monitoring systems (TPMS) may be available. Please note, that even if this feature is installed, it is important to research how the monitoring occurs. With some systems, no alert will be set until the pressure has reached below 25% of the recommended weight. As we mentioned above, the reduced pressure can quickly cause accidents on the jobsite.

If the machine has been fitted for a different tire size than it was manufactured for, it is important to research the changes in necessary pressure. Many manufacturers include pressure recommendations for OEM tires and alternative tire sizes, be sure to reach out to your local Hugg & Hall for more tire specifications.

Selecting the Right Forklift Tires: Pneumatic vs. Cushion | Toyota Forklifts