Tag Archives: Industrial Equipment

Hugg & Hall Equipment Company Announces Acquisition Of Southern Material Handling Company

Dealership Expands to Provide Full Line of Equipment Needs to Eastern Oklahoma

LITTLE ROCK, ARKANSAS – April 1, 2022Hugg & Hall Equipment Company, a leading industrial and construction equipment provider in Arkansas, Oklahoma, Louisiana, Missouri and Texas today announced the acquisition of Southern Material Handling Company of eastern Oklahoma.

“When I made the decision to retire, I knew that I would only consider selling to Hugg & Hall Equipment” says Mark Segress, President and CEO of Southern Material Handling. “I have known John Hugg and Robert Hall for many years and have a great deal of respect for them as individuals and business owners. Their team has built Hugg & Hall into one of the largest and most successful dealerships in the country. I’m excited for our team to join Hugg & Hall and grow in their careers. I know our customers will continue to receive the very best service available. They will have the opportunity to learn about the vast array of products offered by Hugg & Hall to improve their material handling efficiencies.”

Headquartered in Tulsa, Oklahoma, Southern Material Handling began in 1948 as the first forklift dealership in the state of Oklahoma and now represents Toyota Material Handling equipment for eastern Oklahoma. SMH is engaged in the sales of new and used material handling equipment, as well as rental equipment, parts and service.  This acquisition will allow Hugg & Hall to expand its Toyota presence to include the entire state of Oklahoma.

“We are very excited to add eastern Oklahoma to our Toyota territory.” says Robert Hall, Vice President of Hugg & Hall Equipment Company.  “Southern Material Handling has had an excellent reputation for many years.  We will continue that passion for an unequalled customer experience. The addition of more products and services that we offer will add value to our customers, making them even more competitive in their specific industry.”

Hugg & Hall Equipment Company has represented the Toyota brand since 1994, expanding its territory most recently in 2019 to service customers in Louisiana. In addition to Toyota, Southern Material Handling also represents Tennant Cleaning Solutions and Kelly Warehouse Dock Solutions. With the Southern Material Handling acquisition, Hugg & Hall Equipment will now have a team of over 700 employees and 18 locations across Arkansas, Oklahoma, Louisiana, Missouri and Texas.

About Hugg & Hall

Hugg & Hall Equipment Company, headquartered in Little Rock, Arkansas, has been family owned and operated since 1956. The company is a full-service dealer for material handling equipment, representing Toyota, Taylor, Doosan, Crown (Arkansas only) Enersys, Combilift, Sellick, Bobcat, and more. Hugg & Hall provides comprehensive material handling solutions including new & used equipment, parts and service support and a fleet of over 3000 rental forklifts.  The company is also one of the largest construction and industrial equipment rental providers in the south, with a fleet of over 12,000 rental units. With value-added services and a focus on their customers, Hugg & Hall Equipment Company is the one-stop shop for every construction and industrial equipment need.

For more information about Hugg & Hall Equipment Company, please contact John Hugg, President, at john.hugg@hugghall.com.

Average Lifespan of a Forklift

Forklifts, and any heavy equipment for that matter, are a pricey investment. We want to get the most for our money, and want machinery that will last for years to come. So, what is the average lifespan of a forklift?

How Old is My Forklift?

A forklift’s lifespan is measured by hours of use, not years. The industry measures forklift lifespans in hours because every business utilizes their machines at different rates.

For example- if you are wanting to purchase a used forklift from, say a Hugg & Hall salesmen, which would you rather purchase:

A 1-year-old forklift from a prominent local warehouse company that ran its forklift 8 hours per day, seven days per week. (Approximately 2,912 hours total) OR

A forklift from a family owned business that utilized their forklift 12 hours per month for five years. (720 hours total)

This is why we look at machinery in terms of hours instead of actual physical age. The stress on a forklift’s lift mass and the process of constantly lifting and lowering equipment is what causes most machines to break down over time, not so much any parts wearing from age.

How Long Should I Expect My Forklift to Last?

The average lifespan of a forklift is 10,000 hours. This may vary depending on the manufacturer, brands like Doosan and Toyota typically have longer lifespans of 15,000-20,000 hours. When your forklift starts sounding like the junkyard will be its new home soon, a refurb program may save the day! Your forklift will receive a through inspection based on its history and needs. To utilize Hugg & Hall’s refurb program, contact your local PSSR!

Protecting Your Equipment From Theft

How to Protect Your Equipment From Theft

There’s no way to perfectly protect from theft, but there are some measures you can take to reduce your risk. Here are some tips for keeping your equipment protected!

Check your locks!

The obvious first step to protecting equipment is to have secure lock and fence protections in place. That being said, if these protections are not maintained that can lead to disrepair and decreased security. It’s a good idea to create the habit of checking any locks, fencing and other systems that you have in place so as to ensure their reliability and effectiveness. It’s clearly better that you identify any weaknesses before potential criminals do.

Check your cameras!

Many companies employ security systems that include surveillance cameras, while this is an effective measure of preventing and/or documenting criminal activity, it will not be successful if cameras aren’t regularly checked and properly maintained. Our second suggestion is to check your cameras often. Make sure to check that they are operating effectually, positioned at effective angles, are not recording over old footage as a default and that there’s plenty of light in the surveilled areas.

Have a secure process!

Another important step in the process of keeping your equipment safe is to always have procedures in place. If you are planning on renting your equipment then ensure that each renter is properly vetted and to always have a paper trail of identity verification and credit checks. Having a standardized way of operating, that each person in the process maintains, will discourage potential thieves and better protect your equipment. And, if your equipment is stolen anyway, you will have the resources and information necessary to better assist law enforcement with recovering your property.  

Register equipment!

It’s always a good idea to register your equipment with databases like the National Equipment Register (NER). These databases store and maintain your equipment information and VIN numbers so that when/if equipment is stolen, law enforcement can use the stored identifying characteristics to track down and, hopefully, locate stolen items. The American Rental Association (and other like organizations) have partnerships with databases that provide an extra layer of security and a contingency plan in the unfortunate event that your property is stolen.

7 Best Safety Features to Add to Your Forklift Today

7 Best Safety Features to Add to Your Forklift Today

Orange Seat Belt Option

A great safety feature for warehouse forklifts, large plants or any company concerned with tracking operator safety or monitoring safety procedures is the optional orange seat belt addition. Forklift owners can purchase the add-on part and easily install the feature which optimizes overall jobsite safety by creating accountability. The brightly colored seat belts also provide easy visibility for safety managers concerned with monitoring seat belt use and measuring safety procedure implementation.

LED Lighting

LED lights are a great option to consider when ruminating on improved safety as it relates to forklifts and industrial equipment. LED lights can be easily installed to forklift cabs and boast longer-lasting bulbs, a low-profile and brighter projections for more well-lit workplaces.

Left/Right Rear View Mirrors

A simple way to optimize forklift safety is to add left and/or right mirrors to forklift cabs which will enable rear view visibility and could potentially result in avoided accidents.

As approximately 1 in 10 forklifts are involved in an accident each year, according to an article published on Optimum Safety Management, any opportunity to improve forklift safety deserves thoughtful consideration.

Blue/Red Light

Blue/red lights can be added to machines which light up when operators are moving forward or in reverse. There are also lights which cast illuminated shapes on the ground which alert pedestrians to machines moving in the direction of  the light/shape.

This safety feature is ideal for high-volume areas, noisy workplaces or areas which regularly see heavy pedestrian traffic.

Fire Extinguisher

Attachable fire extinguishers can be added to forklift cabs in the event of an emergency. This is a simple way to make forklift operation in your workplace safer.

Track Lighting

Adding to the red/blue light option, there are track lighting options which illuminate forklift working areas so pedestrians/other operators know the parameters to avoid. These clear demarcations increase safety and track lighting features provide an efficient way to alert other workers of unsafe work zones.  

Clear Cab

If your machine will ever be operating outside or exposed to natural elements, the clear cab option offers great protection. The clear attachable roof protects forklift cabs from precipitation and other distracting/obstructing elements. The clear cab part is a particularly great safety feature for machines which will be frequently operated outdoors. 

Read our article on how to safely operate a forklift, here.

How Telematic Technology is Transforming the Equipment Industry

How Telematic Technology is Transforming the Equipment Industry

The use of telematic technology, i.e. telematics, is transforming the way equipment companies manage and maintain their fleets. Telematics have streamlined workplace methodologies from equipment maintenance, reporting, safety/training procedures to operations and more. Telematics combines telecommunications with data processing, storage and retrieval systems. Equipment companies are exploring the capabilities of telematics and how the technology can support more efficient business practices.

How it works

Telematics can be used to track and assess vehicles and is spearheading innovation in the equipment industry. Recently, Matt Conner, Product Support Sales Representative at Hugg & Hall Equipment Company (Hugg & Hall), spoke on how the use of telematics is reshaping the industry.

“Telematics is a technological way to assist companies in managing their industrial equipment and/or fleet,” said Conner. “It allows accurate, up-to-date business metrics at a click of mouse.”

Telematic systems can be customized to fit the varied needs of users. One example of this is in construction versus industrial equipment needs. Construction equipment tends to require satellite-based systems because, locationally, internet-based systems would be more challenging and less reliable. Industrial equipment, often used in plants and warehouses, are often connected to Wi-Fi-based systems. Conner extrapolated on how the different methods are applied.

“The difference is, construction equipment is typically found at many different job sites, so it’s not always contained under one roof,” said Conner. “That’s why satellite is utilized for construction equipment because, using this system, equipment can be pinged anywhere in the U.S. Whereas, industrial equipment, such as forklifts, are typically found under one roof and usually can use Wi-Fi and the cloud to receive information and deliver it back to the portal.”

“It (telematics) allows people, and managers, to work more efficiently,” said Conner. “It keeps them off the floors and doesn’t require them to spend as much time with operators and equipment. They can basically generate reports off of production, utilization and other key components to better manage their fleet, and possibly, their operators.”

Before the implementation of telematics, equipment assessment required more physical time at job sites and with equipment. Telematics has significantly reduced travel and assessment requirements which, in turn, has increased efficacy and productivity rates.  

“Prior to telematics, if there was an issue with a piece of equipment, we had to go on site or rely on the customer to give us enough information to be able to assess issues with equipment and/or asset damage,” said Conner. “So this will free up a lot of our time and prevent us from traveling to unnecessary locations. A lot of customers, when we’re talking about contractors and construction equipment, may have twenty pieces and they might not know where that equipment is located so they might send you to Fayetteville and, in reality, it’s in Bella Vista or something like that. So we can use telematics to track locations and eliminate those issues.”

Safety features

Some capabilities of the technology include tracking operator training schedules, reminder features and safety goals; which can all be assembled in reports and exported for retention and metric tracing.

“So, there are several ways that telematics are affecting the construction and industrial equipment industry, with compliance being one,” said Conner. “On the compliance side, we can manage the equipment. We can actually recertify operator training all through the telematics system. This is tracked automatically, so if your company requires operators and trainers be trained every year, you can set up calendar reminder dates, things like that, so you know when to retrain the operators.”

Telematics is attractive to company safety departments because of the capability to incorporate compliance requirements and auto-track metrics which can then be recorded and saved digitally, which increases efficiency.

“I think that telematics naturally occurred with the development of technology but there were probably some driving forces behind it, too,” said Conner, referring to the implementation of telematic technology within equipment fleets. “I think safety departments were a big push for this because typically, with telematics, you can incorporate compliance checklists. So we’re getting away from the paper trail, everything can be filed online, in the cloud. So, as far as complying with OSHA, and some of the safety aspects of particular companies, it’s a lot more manageable with the telematics system.”

The future of telematics in the equipment industry

Telematic technology has transformed the way companies track maintenance schedules, assess impact damage, track operator productivity, meet compliance requirements, locate equipment and more. Telematics is expected to further progress and offer fleet owners more advanced features and capabilities.

“Telematics has already progressed quite a bit and I think that we’re really just at the beginning of it,” said Conner. “I think there’s going to come a time when you can purchase a telematics system that’s totally customizable, per specific customer needs. There’s some software out there now that will actually cause forklifts to slow down in certain areas, if you have a really highly trafficked pedestrian area in a plant for example, which minimizes accidents. Once the forklift goes into this location it will automatically slow down until it reaches certain parameters where it will then go back to standard operation.”

The full potential of telematic systems is yet to be seen, but is expected to continue progressing with the development of computer applications, improved processing power and fleet owner needs/expectations.

ANSI A92: NEW STANDARDS TO REQUIRE CUSTOMER EDUCATION, TRAINING & ENGAGEMENT

ANSI_ NEW REGULATIONS WILL REQUIRE CUSTOMER EDUCATION & TRAINING

Hugg & Hall Equipment Company (Hugg & Hall) is committed to transparency and keeping customers informed of industry updates/regulations to ensure successful transitions and positive experiences.

The importance of educating customers on impact of new standards

The American National Standards Institute (ANSI) is expected to release new standards for boom and scissor-type lifts, in the coming months. The updated standards have significant implications for the construction, equipment rental and equipment sales industries and will impact prices, training and operations. An important aspect of the implementation will be equipping customers for the change; both for awareness and preparation purposes.

The new regulations are replacing prior ANSI standards A92.3, A92.5, A92.6 and A92.8 which covered manually propelled aerial, booms, scissors and under-bridge inspection machines. The updates are focused on moving North American equipment toward current global standards. The updates to regulation will include: terminology changes, platform load sensing technology requirements, new wind force requirements, new stability testing, new railing height requirements and new platform entry requirements. ANSI and their Canadian counterpart, the Canadian Standards Authority (CSA), are moving toward equipment design standards that will bring North American equipment up-to-date with the current standards implemented in Europe to reduce global variances in the industry.

Educating customers is particularly important because of the, plausibly, profound impact that the new standards will have on equipment operation and prices (on compliant machines). Manufacturers will be forced to invest in production to supply compliant machines within the one-year from implementation limit and the new features and production costs will raise the prices of machines for direct buyers, including rental companies.

The precise impact of the new standards is yet to seen, but it’s clear that the standards will have a significant impact on prices, equipment operation and training procedures. Thus education will be very important to ensure a smooth transition for companies and their customers.

How training will play a part in the implementation of the new standards

Training is expected to play an integral part in the successful implementation of the new A92 standards. New training and familiarization requirements will be implemented under sections A92.22 and A92.24. A significant change to prior requirements is in the new requirement of training occupants and supervisors along with operators. In addition, online theory will be available as an option for operator training.

Occupant training will include the use of fall protection, stability factors, safe use of accessories, work procedures, hazard avoidance, manufacturer warnings/instructions, site risk assessment, general knowledge and basic operation comprehension.

Supervisor training will include proper equipment selection, potential hazards training, applicable rules/regulations/standards and manufacturer operation manuals.

Recently, James Lennartz, Training Manager at Hugg & Hall, spoke on the importance of training as it relates to the ANSI A92 updates.

“We need to make sure that our customers are prepared for the changes so that they do not lose valuable time on their projects,” said Lennartz. “Every single one of our customers are on time schedules to complete their projects and if they are not aware of the coming changes they have the potential to fall behind on the completion date and lose money; their delays cost their customers time and money. A vicious cycle.”

The standards specify requirements for application, inspection, training, maintenance, repair and safe operation of Mobile Elevating Work Platforms (MEWPs) formally known as Aerial Work Platforms (AWPs), according to Lennartz.

“Our task as trainers is to ensure that our customers are aware of all changes and how they will affect their daily processes throughout the work day on each jobsite,” said Lennartz. “No one jobsite is the same nor are the conditions at which the MEWPs are being used by our customers. We need to make sure that both operators of MEWPs and their supervisors are able to safely operate and evaluate the use of MEWPs.”

Lennartz elaborated on how Hugg & Hall trainers are strategizing to accomplish these important goals.

“We hope to accomplish this by providing the necessary information in regards to the features, functions, safety devices, equipment limitations and operating characteristics as defined by the manufacturer, utilizing both the standards and operator manuals,” said Lennartz.    

The new ANSI standards will require more customer engagement, which is a primary reason customer education/training, leading up to the implementation of the standards, is essential.

“From what we are seeing the customer is going to have a bigger role in how their operators are using the MEWPs,” said Lennartz.

Customers are expected to be more involved in areas such as safe use planning, records retention, personnel qualifications, training requirements and rescue from height plans, according to Lennartz.

“Personnel operating MEWPs will be trained based on the classification of equipment that they will operate as equipment will be divided into different types and groups,” said Lennartz.

Though the new standards are yet to be released, the Hugg & Hall team is committed to keeping customers educated on upcoming industry changes and is dedicated to providing the needed support and resources.